Showing posts from December, 2013

A Visit From the Eagle

It is a very cold day outside with some snow flurries. That being said, it is a great day to do some writing inside a warm house. I was trying to decide what to write about on my blog today when the blog story flew into the neighbor's yard. We have a pair of nesting eagles that live north of our property on the White River. I have seen them flying down the river on occasions when I have been gardening, but I never was able to take a photo or have a camera available when I needed one. 

Today, my husband was working in the cabin when he spotted the eagle sitting in the tree in the neighbor's yard. He called up to the house to tell me. I grabbed the camera and my coat and headed down towards the river. Sitting high in a sycamore tree overlooking the river was a bald eagle. I started taking pictures and slowly moved closer and closer to the tree. The eagle's back was towards me and I was able to get close enough that he didn't see me. I took lots of photos of this majest…

Virginia Bluebells

When spring arrives in my garden, the Virginia Bluebells become some of the early color to the garden. Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) are easy to grow and are self-sowing once they are established. They grow in Zones 3-9 in shaded areas and are wonderful for a woodland garden. I once worked in a garden where the client had her entire backyard planted in Virginia Bluebells. When they flowered it was spectacular! This is a plant that looks great when mixed in with spring flowering bulbs.

When Virginia Bluebells begin to grow in the spring, the flower blossoms are pink and then they turn to that beautiful sky blue color. They finally reach a height of about 12 to 20 inches tall. They prefer humus-rich, well drained soil that is slightly acidic. Virginia Bluebells are native to the United States.

When the temperatures begin to rise and the trees start to leaf out, the Virginia Bluebells will go down for the year. They will yellow and flatten out on the ground. I normally do not…

Love Those Alliums!

Back during the summer, I had the opportunity to tour several gardens. One plant that I saw that I really liked was the allium. That big round flower ball on that tall stem, just stands out in a garden. I have a few in my garden, but they were some that I inherited and not in a mass planting. This year, I decided to add more to my garden and I can't wait to see them in the spring!
Alliums are easy to grow bulbs that are in the onion family. They come in colors of purple, white, yellow and pink. They need to be planted in well drained soil in a sun or part shade location. Alliums can grow from 4 inches to 3 feet depending on the variety. Make sure to allow at least a foot between each bulb when planting.  I love the look of alliums. They add whimsical structure and texture to any garden. The flower ball on top is made up of lots of small florets. Alliums are great as cut flowers or they can be used in dried floral arrangement. They look great in a mass planting in containers, beds…